Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has left the country

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Edge Guerrero
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Re: Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has left the country

Postby Edge Guerrero » Sat Sep 04, 2021 7:14 pm

Megaterio Llamas wrote:
Edge Guerrero wrote:
Megaterio Llamas wrote:Image



-You think they will mantain the helicopters and airplanes wornking?
The Maintenance is pretty hard!


I think they may leave that up to the Iranians, Russians, Pakistanis and Chinese ;)


- Touche!

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Postby Edge Guerrero » Fri Sep 17, 2021 12:16 am

- I 'm without internet. Did you guy's read about Taliban executing civilians?
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Postby Edge Guerrero » Fri Sep 17, 2021 7:57 pm

Afghanistan: Life under Taliban rule one month on

By Secunder Kermani
BBC News, Mazar-i-Sharif

At Afghanistan's border with Uzbekistan a cargo train rolls over a bridge and into the newly created "Islamic Emirate". The Taliban's white and black flag flutters next to the Uzbek one. Some traders have welcomed the group's return to power. The driver of a truck being loaded with wheat tells me in the past he was regularly forced to pay bribes to corrupt police officials whenever passing their checkpoints. "Now, it's not like that," he says. "I could drive all the way to Kabul and not pay a penny."

It's been exactly one month since the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Now cash is in short supply, and the country is facing a mounting economic crisis.

One source in the business community tells us trade levels have dropped significantly, as Afghan importers aren't able to pay for new goods. The Taliban's head of customs at Hairatan port, Maulvi Saeed, tells us the group is cutting duty rates to promote trade, and wants to encourage wealthy traders to return to the country. "It will create jobs for the people, and the businessmen will be rewarded in the afterlife," he says.

Around an hour's drive away is Mazar-i-Sharif, the country's fourth largest city. On the surface life appears to be continuing as normal, though many are suffering financially.

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I head to the intricately tiled Blue Mosque, the cultural heart of the city. I was last here in August, shortly before the Taliban takeover. Back then, the grounds were teeming with young men and women posing for selfies.

Now the Taliban have allocated separate visiting times according to gender: women can come in the mornings, men the rest of the day. When we visit, there are plenty of women strolling around, but there seem to be significantly fewer than before. "Things are alright, but maybe people still need more time to get used to the new government," one woman suggests timidly.

I'm meeting Haji Hekmat, an influential local Taliban leader. "You might have brought security," I put to him, "but your critics say you're killing the culture here."

"No," he replies emphatically, "Western influences have been here for the past 20 years… Control of Afghanistan has passed from one foreign hand to another for 40 years, we have lost our own traditions and values. We are bringing our culture back to life."

According to his understanding of Islam, the mixing of men and women is prohibited.

Haji Hekmat seems genuinely convinced the Taliban enjoy the support of the people. Out of his earshot, however, one female visitor whispered to a colleague, "These are not good people."

Whilst the Taliban's interpretation of Islam might clash less with the values of those in more rural, socially conservative villages - in bigger Afghan cities, many remain deeply suspicious of the group. Haji Hekmat puts this down to years of "propaganda" but a history of suicide bombings and targeted assassinations in urban areas is clearly also responsible.

As we leave the Blue Mosque, we spot a large and excited crowd by the main road, and elbow our way to the centre. Four dead bodies with bullet wounds are laid out on display. One has a small handwritten note on top of it describing the men as kidnappers, warning other criminals their punishment will be the same.

Despite the smell of the bodies under the hot sun, the crowd snap photos and try to push past each other for a better look. Violent crime has long been a major problem in Afghanistan's big cities, and even their critics credit the Taliban with improving security. One onlooker tells us, "If they are kidnappers it's a good thing. It will be a lesson for others."

But lots of others in the city don't feel safe. Law student Farzana, tells us, "Every time I step out of my house and I see the Taliban, I shiver with fear."

Private universities like hers are open, but those run by the government remain shut for now. Under the new Taliban rule, male and female students who are studying in the same classroom must be separated by a curtain.

For Farzana, that's not the priority though. She's concerned that the Taliban may not let women work - something the group has denied. For the moment, though, women in Afghanistan are being told to stay at home for their own safety, unless they are teachers or medics.

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"Right now I feel hopeless," Farzana says, "but I'm doing my best to stay optimistic for the future."

The last time the Taliban were in power, they introduced far more restrictive measures than they have so far on this occasion, banning women from leaving home without a male companion for example. Much of the fear in Afghan cities today is that similar laws could eventually be introduced again.

Whilst the Taliban are in firm control of the country, they're yet to win the hearts and minds of many residents. Haji Hekmat acknowledges, "Taking over the country militarily was hard, implementing the rule of law and protecting it is even harder."

Additional reporting by Malik Mudasir and Shams Ahmadzai

Source https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-58550640
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Postby Edge Guerrero » Fri Sep 17, 2021 11:24 pm

Drone attack killed 10 civilians in Kabul, US acknowledges

Top US general offers apology and says it is ‘unlikely’ that those killed in Afghanistan were associated with ISKP.

]Image
Afghans inspect damage of Ahmadi family house after US drone raid in Kabul on August 29 [File: Khwaja Tawfiq Sediqi/AP photo]


General Frank McKenzie, the head of the US Central Command, acknowledged that a US drone raid in Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul, late in August killed 10 civilians, including children.

McKenzie said on Friday that it was “unlikely” that those killed were associated with the Islamic State in Khorasan Province, ISKP (ISIS-K), as originally claimed by the US military.

“Having thoroughly reviewed the findings of the investigation and the supporting analysis by interagency partners, I am now convinced that as many as 10 civilians, including up to seven children, were tragically killed in that strike,” McKenzie said.

The US general offered “profound condolences” to the families of the victims, stressing that the attack was taken with the “earnest belief” that it would prevent an imminent attack on the airport where American forces were evacuating people.

“It was a mistake, and I offer my sincere apology,” McKenzie said. “As a combatant commander, I am fully responsible for this strike and this tragic outcome.”

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin offered condolences for the attack’s victims on Friday and announced a “thorough review” of the investigation into the attack that will also consider the need to alter “strike authorities, procedures and processes” in the future.

“We apologize, and we will endeavour to learn from this horrible mistake,” Austin said in a statement.

Pentagon acknowledges ‘mistakes

The strike on August 29 came days after a suicide bombing near the airport, claimed by ISKP, killed at least 175 people, including 13 US service members.

The US pulled all of its forces from Afghanistan by the end of last month as the Taliban took over the country, capturing Kabul in mid-August.

US troops, which remained in control of the airport in Kabul as the Taliban took control of the capital, conducted a massive and chaotic evacuation operation to airlift American citizens, third-country nationals and Afghan allies.

American officials warned of “credible” threats to the airport by ISKP throughout the evacuation operation.

Family members of the August 29 drone raid victims told Al Jazeera after the attack that the 10 people killed ranged in age from two to 40 years old.

“They were innocent, helpless children,” Aimal Ahmadi, whose nieces and nephews were killed in the attack, told Al Jazeera at the time.

Despite early media reports of civilian casualties, the Pentagon initially defended the attack, stressing that it killed ISKP operatives.

Mark Milley, the top US general, called the drone attack “righteous” on September 1.

“I don’t want to influence the outcome of an investigation, but at this point we think that the procedures were correctly followed and it was a righteous strike,” Milley said then.

Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said Austin has asked for a review of the drone raid investigation to include accountability for the measures used to choose the target.

Congressman Adam Schiff, a Democrat who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, raised concerns about “accuracy and completeness of public statements” after the drone attack.

“In acknowledging that error, the Department of Defense has taken the first step towards transparency and accountability. And after such a devastating failure – one that, by the Department’s estimate, killed 10 civilians, at least 7 of them children – it cannot be the last step,” Schiff said in a statement.

“We need to know what went wrong in the hours and minutes leading up to the strike to prevent similar tragedies in the future.”

On Friday, McKenzie said the Pentagon stood by the raid early on based on the intelligence available at the time, noting that he ordered a “comprehensive review” of the footage from the attack 24 hours after it took place.

“I was confident that the strike had averted an imminent threat to our forces at the airport,” McKenzie said at a news briefing.

“Based upon that assessment, I and other leaders in the Department [of Defense] repeatedly asserted the validity of this strike. I’m here today to set the record straight and acknowledge our mistakes.”

US considering compensation for families

McKenzie described a series of activities by the vehicle targeted by the raid that gave the impression that it was linked to a possible attack on the airport, including a stop at a building associated with ISKP operatives.

The Pentagon officials initially said that secondary blasts that followed the drone attack indicated that the vehicle was carrying explosives.

On Friday, McKenzie appeared to acknowledge that the early assessment was faulty.

“Subsequent analysis could not rule out the presence of a small amount of explosive material but determined that the most likely cause was the ignition of gas from a propane tank located immediately behind the car,” he said.

McKenzie said the US is considering “ex gratia” financial compensation for the families of the victims, but he noted that it is difficult to reach out to people on the ground in Afghanistan now.

Amnesty International welcomed the acknowledgement of civil casualties by the US military on Friday but called for prosecuting those “suspected of criminal responsibility” in the attack.

“Survivors and families of the victims should be kept informed of the progress of the investigation and be given full reparation,” Brian Castner, senior crisis adviser with Amnesty’s crisis response programme, said in a statement.

“It should be noted that the US military was only forced to admit to its failure in this strike because of the current global scrutiny on Afghanistan.”

Source https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/9/17/drone-strike-killed-10-civilians-in-kabul-us-acknowledges
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Don't be selfish, preserve this world for the next generations.

I'll never long for what might have been
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HOAXID19
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Postby HOAXID19 » Mon Sep 20, 2021 10:09 pm

I've heard the Taliban has banned Abortion, HOAXID-19 vaccines, and LGBTQ+ propaganda, along with getting rid of BLM and SJW propaganda as well.

https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/14 ... 4180380674

Based. As much as I am not a fan of their misogyny or violence towards LGBTQ+ people, they are doing a lot of awesome things that the rest of the world needs to do (even Iran, North Korea, Russia, and Syria).

The West (and much other parts of the world) is filled with Anti-White Racism and Misandry, which really angers me a lot. Finally, a country standing up to Anti-White/BLM/LGBTQ+/Misandrist/SJW propaganda.


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