Woden worship wandered onward til the 1750s, and likely later

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Luigi
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Woden worship wandered onward til the 1750s, and likely later

Postby Luigi » Sat Jul 28, 2018 10:18 am

In Orkney in 1774 the churchman George Low wrote:

"There was a custom among the lower class of people in this country which has entirely subsided within these twenty or thirty years. Upon the first day of every new year the common people, from all parts of the country, met at the Kirk of Stainhouse (Stennis), each person having provision for four or five days; they continued there for that time dancing and feasting in the kirk... The parties agreed stole from the rest of their companions, and went to the Temple of the Moon, where the woman, in presence of the man, fell down on her knees and prayed the god Wodden (for such was the name of the god they addressed upon this occasion) that he would enable her to perform all the promises and obligations she had and was to make to the young man present, after which they both went to the Temple of the Sun, where the man prayed in like manner before the woman, then they repaired from this to the stone [known as Wodden's or Odin's Stone], and the man being on one side and the woman on the other, they took hold of each other's right hand through the hole, and there swore to be constant and faithful to each other. This ceremony was held so very sacred in those times that the person who dared to break the engagement made here was counted infamous, and excluded all society"

We have record in the 1690s of requests for foreign clergy to be sent to Orkney to deal with their "immoral practices" which quite seemingly refered to their not so subtle pagan beliefs. If Mr. Low is correct it only took 50-60 years to stop this practice, but from my study of the rather late erasure of pagan remnants in Baltic and Finnic societies it seems much more likely that the pagan elements entered a crypto-state before being lost. Based on European parallels this crypto-faith must have lasted at least 100 years but based on other evidence it seems quite possible this survived all the way to the early 20th century before being destroyed not by priests, but by modernity.

Orcadians swore their sacred oaths on the Odin stone until the day it was destroyed by an outlander in 1814. Even after its destruction weddings and other oaths were done in the area among the other nearby stones well into the late 1800s. The main fragment of the Odin stone was used as a mill anchor and when in the 1940s the mill was replaced with modern argicultural machinery the farmers son was unable to move the stone and smashed it. His father was furious with him for this, showing at least some reverence for it.

http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/odinstone/index.html
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Postby Edge Guerrero » Sun Jul 29, 2018 1:37 pm

Luigi wrote:In Orkney in 1774 the churchman George Low wrote:

"There was a custom among the lower class of people in this country which has entirely subsided within these twenty or thirty years. Upon the first day of every new year the common people, from all parts of the country, met at the Kirk of Stainhouse (Stennis), each person having provision for four or five days; they continued there for that time dancing and feasting in the kirk... The parties agreed stole from the rest of their companions, and went to the Temple of the Moon, where the woman, in presence of the man, fell down on her knees and prayed the god Wodden (for such was the name of the god they addressed upon this occasion) that he would enable her to perform all the promises and obligations she had and was to make to the young man present, after which they both went to the Temple of the Sun, where the man prayed in like manner before the woman, then they repaired from this to the stone [known as Wodden's or Odin's Stone], and the man being on one side and the woman on the other, they took hold of each other's right hand through the hole, and there swore to be constant and faithful to each other. This ceremony was held so very sacred in those times that the person who dared to break the engagement made here was counted infamous, and excluded all society"

We have record in the 1690s of requests for foreign clergy to be sent to Orkney to deal with their "immoral practices" which quite seemingly refered to their not so subtle pagan beliefs. If Mr. Low is correct it only took 50-60 years to stop this practice, but from my study of the rather late erasure of pagan remnants in Baltic and Finnic societies it seems much more likely that the pagan elements entered a crypto-state before being lost. Based on European parallels this crypto-faith must have lasted at least 100 years but based on other evidence it seems quite possible this survived all the way to the early 20th century before being destroyed not by priests, but by modernity.

Orcadians swore their sacred oaths on the Odin stone until the day it was destroyed by an outlander in 1814. Even after its destruction weddings and other oaths were done in the area among the other nearby stones well into the late 1800s. The main fragment of the Odin stone was used as a mill anchor and when in the 1940s the mill was replaced with modern argicultural machinery the farmers son was unable to move the stone and smashed it. His father was furious with him for this, showing at least some reverence for it.

http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/odinstone/index.html


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Postby Luigi » Thu Aug 02, 2018 5:22 am

Another highly significant piece of evidence: The Charm of the Wreestin Threed(wresting thread)

This was a charm found in Orkney folk magic which was used to heal strains and accompanied the tieing of 9 knots in a thread(9 is the most sacred number in Germanic Paganism, the number 3 and its multiples are the holy numbers of all Indo-European faiths). It goes as follows:

Oor Savior rade,
His fore-foot slade;
Our Savior lichtit down.
Sinew to sinew, vein to vein,
Joint to joint, and bane to bane,
Mend thoo in Geud's name!

As you can see the charm has been Christianized, but this charm will be quite familiar to Germanic pagan folk, as one of very few pieces of evidence for Germanic paganism from Germany is the Madgeburg Incantations, in which Wotan uses a charm to heal the injured horse of Baldur:

Phol and Wodan rode into the woods,
There Balder's foal sprained its foot.
It was charmed by Sinthgunt, her sister Sunna;
It was charmed by Frija, her sister Volla;
It was charmed by Wodan, as he well knew how:
Bone-sprain, like blood-sprain,
Like limb-sprain:
Bone to bone; blood to blood;
Limb to limb -- like they were glued.

I got the information on the charm of the wreestin threed from the same Orkney site, here is the link: http://www.orkneyjar.com/tradition/wreestin.htm

However one thing the author did not note, but will be well known to scholars of Indo-European comparative studies, is that this charm is also found in the Sanskrit Vedas and is likely the only instance of full sentences which can be traced all the way back to Proto-Indo European sentences(as opposed to the individual words). If I remeber correctly in the Vedas it is also used to cure a wounded horse. All credit to J.P. Mallory for noting this co-occurance and realizing its significance.
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