Ireland used to have Scots-like languages that died out in the 1800s

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Luigi
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Ireland used to have Scots-like languages that died out in the 1800s

Postby Luigi » Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:00 am

I just found out about this and thought it was pretty cool. For those who didnt know the Norman kings of England went on a sidequest and conquered coastal Ireland in the late middle ages. The middle English of their soldiers spread there and grew into 2 distinct yet highly intelligible languages very much like Scots. However unlike Scots these did not survive the test of time, dying out a little over 100 years ago.

Fingallian is clearly very influenced by modern English and its easier to understand than Scots:

e.g.

On a day in the Spring,
As I went to bolring
to view the jolly Daunciers,
They did trip it so high
(Be me shole!) I did spee
six Cunts abateing Seav'n hairs

But the Forth and Bargy Tongue is much less so and its even harder to understand than Scots:

e.g.

Fade teil thee zo lournagh, co Joane, zo knaggee?
Th' weithest all curcagh, wafur, an cornee.
Lidge w'ouse an a milagh, tis gaay an louthee:
Huck nigher; y'art scuddeen; fartoo zo hachee?

But, sometimes you will find a section that is pretty easy to understand:

e.g.

'Cham góeen to tell thee óa taale at is drúe
Aar is ing Rosslaarè óa mýdhe geoudè an drúe
Shoo wearth ing her haté óa ribbonè at is blúe
An shoo goeth to ee faaythè earchee deie too
Ich meezil bee ing ee faaythè éarchee deie zoo
At ich zee dhicka mýdhe fhó is geoudè an drúe

Wiki links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingallian

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forth_and_Bargy_dialect
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Diet Butcher
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Postby Diet Butcher » Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:55 am

What does Huck Nigher mean?

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Megaterio Llamas
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Postby Megaterio Llamas » Sat Apr 14, 2018 2:44 am

Luigi wrote:I just found out about this and thought it was pretty cool. For those who didnt know the Norman kings of England went on a sidequest and conquered coastal Ireland in the late middle ages. The middle English of their soldiers spread there and grew into 2 distinct yet highly intelligible languages very much like Scots. However unlike Scots these did not survive the test of time, dying out a little over 100 years ago.

Fingallian is clearly very influenced by modern English and its easier to understand than Scots:

e.g.

On a day in the Spring,
As I went to bolring
to view the jolly Daunciers,
They did trip it so high
(Be me shole!) I did spee
six Cunts abateing Seav'n hairs

But the Forth and Bargy Tongue is much less so and its even harder to understand than Scots:

e.g.

Fade teil thee zo lournagh, co Joane, zo knaggee?
Th' weithest all curcagh, wafur, an cornee.
Lidge w'ouse an a milagh, tis gaay an louthee:
Huck nigher; y'art scuddeen; fartoo zo hachee?

But, sometimes you will find a section that is pretty easy to understand:

e.g.

'Cham góeen to tell thee óa taale at is drúe
Aar is ing Rosslaarè óa mýdhe geoudè an drúe
Shoo wearth ing her haté óa ribbonè at is blúe
An shoo goeth to ee faaythè earchee deie too
Ich meezil bee ing ee faaythè éarchee deie zoo
At ich zee dhicka mýdhe fhó is geoudè an drúe

Wiki links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingallian

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forth_and_Bargy_dialect

Really interesting stuff Luigi. First I heard of it.

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Luigi
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Postby Luigi » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:03 am

Diet Butcher wrote:What does Huck Nigher mean?

Come nearer. I think I have heard come nigh as in come over here before. Maybe in shakespeare or something.
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